516 stories
·
9 followers

Representists versus Propertyists: RabbitDucks – being good for what?

1 Share

kaninchen_und_ente

It is not that unusual in statistics to get the same statistical output (uncertainty interval, estimate, tail probability,etc.) for every sample, or some samples or the same distribution of outputs or the same expectations of outputs or just close enough expectations of outputs. Then, I would argue one has a variation on a DuckRabbit. In the DuckRabbit, the same sign represents different objects with different interpretations (what to make of it) whereas here we have differing signs (models) representing the same object (an inference of interest) with different interpretations (what to make of them). I will imaginatively call this a RabbitDuck ;-)

Does one always choose a Rabbit or a Duck, or sometimes one or another or always both? I would argue the higher road is both – that is to use differing models to collect and consider the  different interpretations. Multiple perspectives can always be more informative (if properly processed), increasing our hopes to find out how things actually are by increasing the chances and rate of getting less wrong. Though this getting less wrong is in expectation only – it really is an uncertain world.

Of course, in statistics a good guess for the Rabbit interpretation would be Bayesian and for the Duck, Frequentest (Canadian spelling). Though, as one of Andrew’s colleagues once argued it is really modellers versus non modellers rather than Bayesians versus Frequentests and that makes a lot of sense to me. Representists are Rabbits “conjecturing, assessing, and adopting idealized representations of reality, predominantly using probability generating models for both parameters and data” while  Propertyists are Ducks “primarily being about discerning procedures with good properties that are uniform over a wide range of possible underlying realities and restricting use, especially in science, to just those procedures” from here.  Given that “idealized representations of reality” can only be indirectly checked (i.e. always remain possibly wrong) and “good properties” always beg the question “good for what?” (as well as only hold over a range of possible but largely unrepresented realities) – it should be a no brainer? that would it be more profitable than not to thoroughly think through both perspectives (and more actually).

An alternative view might be Leo Breiman’s “two cultures” paper.

This issue of multiple perspectives also came up in Bob’s recent post where the possibility arose that some might think it taboo to mix Bayes and Frequentist perspectives.

Some case studies would be: 

Case study 1: The Bayesian inference completely solves the multiple comparisons problem post.

In this blog post, Andrew implements and contrasts both the Rabbit route and the Duck route to get uncertainty intervals (using simulation for ease of wide understanding). It turns out that the intervals will not be different under a flat prior, while increasingly different under increasingly informative priors. Now the Duck route guarantees a property that is considered to be important and good by many – “uniform confidence coverage” and by some, even mandatory  (e.g. see here). The Rabbit route with a flat prior will also happens to have this property (as it gives the same intervals). Perhaps to inform the good for what property, Andrew evaluates another property of  making “claims with confidence” (type S and M error rates) and additionally evaluates that property.

With respect to this property “claims with confidence”, the Duck route (and the Rabbit route with flat prior) does not do so well – horribly actually. Now, informed with these two perspectives, it seems almost obvious that if a prior centred at zero and not too wide (implying large and very large effects are unlikely) is a reasonable “idealized representations of reality” for the area one is working in, the Rabbit route’s will have good properties while the Duck route’s guaranteed “good property” ain’t so good for you.  On the other hand if effects of any size are all just as likely (which would be a strange universe to live in, perhaps not even possible) and you always keep in mind all the intervals you encounter, the Duck route will be fine.

Case study 2: The Bayesian Bootstrap

In the paper, Rubin outlines a Bayesian bootstrap that provides close enough expectations of outputs to the simple or vanilla bootstrap and argues that the implicit prior involved is _silly_ for some or many empirical research applications and hence shows the vanilla bootstrap is not an “analytic panacea that allows us to pull ourselves up by the bootstraps”. The bootstrap simply cannot avoid sensitivity to model assumptions. And in this post I am emphasising that _any_ model assumptions that give rise to a procedure with similar enough properties whether considered, used or even believed relevant? should be thought through. Not sure where this “case study” sits today – at one point Brad Efron was advancing ideas based on the bootstrap “as an automatic device for constructing Welch and Peers’ (1963) “probability matching priors” .

An aside, I find interesting in this paper of Rubin is the italicized phrase “with replacement”. It might be common knowledge today that the vanilla bootstrap simply samples from all possible sample paths of length n with replacement, but certainly in 1981 few seemed to realise that.  I know because when Peter McCullagh presented work that was later published in Re-sampling and exchangeable arrays 2000 at the University of Toronto, I pointed this out to him and his response indicated he was not aware of this.

Case study 3: Bayarri et al Rejection Odds and Rejection Ratios .

This is a suggested Bayesian/Frequentest compromise for replacing the dreaded p_value/NHST.  It is not being put forward as the best method for a replacement but rather one that can be easily adopted widely – Bayes with training wheels or a Frequentest approach with better balanced errors. Essentially a Bayesian inference that matches a frequentest expectation with the argument that “Any curve that has the right frequentist expectation is a valid frequentist report.”

I am not expected most readers will read even one of these case studies, but rather readers who do or have already read them, might share their views in comments.

 

The post Representists versus Propertyists: RabbitDucks – being good for what? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read the whole story
diogro
9 days ago
reply
São Paulo
Share this story
Delete

My proposal for JASA

1 Share

Whenever they’ve asked me to edit a statistics journal, I say no thank you because I think I can make more of a contribution through this blog. I’ve said no enough times that they’ve stopped asking me. But I’ve had an idea for awhile and now I want to do it.

I think that journals should get out of the publication business and recognize that their goal is curation. My preferred model is that everything gets published on some sort of super-Arxiv, and then the role of an organization such as the Journal of the American Statistical Association is to pick papers to review and to recommend. The “journal” is then the review reports plus the editors’ recommendations plus links to the original paper and any updates plus post-publication comments.

If JASA is interested in going this route, I’m in.

The post My proposal for JASA appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read the whole story
diogro
9 days ago
reply
São Paulo
Share this story
Delete

Hottest Editors

9 Comments and 14 Shares
Elon Musk finally blocked me from the internal Tesla repository because I wouldn't stop sending pull requests for my code supporting steering via vim keybindings.
Read the whole story
diogro
18 days ago
reply
São Paulo
Share this story
Delete
9 public comments
copyninja
12 days ago
reply
I'm still emacs user (slight correction spacemacs)
India
satadru
16 days ago
reply
2035 — The rising popularity of retrocomputing brings about a vim keybinding mod for ResEdit, written by a CRISPRed kid.
New York, NY
minderella
17 days ago
reply
Notepad Plus baby!
tingham
17 days ago
reply
Should I be ashamed more for still listening to Slipknot or that I still use Vim?
Cary, NC
Cthulhux
17 days ago
reply
ed is the standard text editor.
Fledermausland
sirshannon
17 days ago
reply
2010 and 2015 are correct for me.
gmuslera
18 days ago
reply
Emacs hottest feature was it's demise: climate change is caused by people abusing C-x M-c M-Butterfly https://xkcd.com/378/
montevideo, uy
alt_text_bot
18 days ago
reply
Elon Musk finally blocked me from the internal Tesla repository because I wouldn't stop sending pull requests for my code supporting steering via vim keybindings.
Covarr
18 days ago
reply
I'm pretty sure 2020's hottest editor will be a minecraft mod that can load plaintext files as in-world signs and then resave them back to plaintext files.
Moses Lake, WA
beowuff
18 days ago
It'll be called mc-vim
duerig
18 days ago
And you'll have to pay McDonalds royalty money to use it... :)
Samuele96
17 days ago
It sound pretty much like atom

Kendall Jenner’s Pepsi Commercial: the Untold Story

1 Share

Kendall Jenner Pepsi Man Repeller

Ad man in suit #1: Okay guys, it’s about time to get started. Grab your sandwiches and Cokes and find your seats. Today we’re brainstorming our Kendall Jenner Spring ’17 campaign. Remember there are no bad ideas. Truly. Everything is a good idea.

Woman: Well, Kendall is passionate about photography. What if we showed her getting behind the lens and giving the spotlight to women she admi-

Ad man #2: Resistance.

Room explodes in cheers.

Woman: Sorry what?

Ad man #2: Millennials love resistance.

Ad man #1: Yes, resistance. (Man tips glasses down and peers at his list of keywords pulled from Millennial OpEds.) And expressing themselves authentically.

Ad man #3: Yes! Love it.

Woman: I’m sorry, can you be more specific?

Ad man #2: Imagine a protest. (Man takes sip of Coke Zero) People laughing, screen full of protest joy. Posters in beautiful Pepsi blue. City kids dancing and stuff.

Ad man #4: (Looks up from Post-it note left on his notebook from last meeting) Diversity.

Ad man #1: What?

Ad man #4: I’m not sure. This Post-it just says “diversity.”

Ad man #1: We’ll just put that on the casting call sheet, it will be fine.

Woman: Are you worried about commodifying something like the act protest? And, I don’t know, systemic oppression? I’m no expert but…I don’t know, just a thought.

Ad man #2: A cold open of a man playing a cello on a roof, an American city in the background.

The men in the room get chills.

Cut to him playing his cello in a room. The protest will be happening on the street. He’ll stop playing, take a sip of Pepsi and then join the march, where he’ll see Kendall Jenner looking super sexy and they’ll fall in love.

Ad man #1: Hmmm, I like where this is going. How can we fit in more diverse millennials expressing themselves…(looks down at list again)…with no filter?

Room falls silent for several minutes.

Ad man #2: A photographer. In hijab.

Room erupts in a standing ovation. Ad man #2 stands on table and shotguns a Coke.

It’s her passion. But she just can’t get her shot. So she joins the protest for inspiration, where she sees a very photogenic and beautiful Kendall Jenner, marching her activist little heart out. In a thong? Or is that too much? Woman?

Woman: I’m so sorry — what is this protest about exactly?

Ad man #3: Yes! And she should be blonde!

Ad man #1: Her contract stipulates that we not touch her hair.

Everyone around the table looks sad. They love blondes.

Ad man #2. A wig. That she’s wearing for a photoshoot happening nearby because she’s a model. She sexily tears it off before joining the protest.

Ad man #3: That’s it! And lipstick that she wipes off, all dramatic. And maybe a dress that she takes off?

There is cheering and high-fiving as they imagine it.

Woman: Taking lipstick off actually takes like, a full minute and it’s pretty messy…and wigs don’t really-

Ad man #1: (Looking at requirement sheet) We need more people drinking Pepsi in this spot or we’re gonna get in trouble again.

Ad man #2: An ice bucket. At the protest. I think I have a spare one at home from a barbecue last weekend.

Ad man #5: Can we have protest spectators sitting at nice restaurants drinking Pepsi?

Woman: Sorry. What’s a “protest spectator?”

Ad man #1: The other thing is blue. We need everything to be the same shade of blue. Don’t ask, it’s subliminal.

Ad man #2: Beautiful. So we have a cello player, a photographer and a model joining a fun and passionate protest.

Woman: Again — a protest about what, exactly?

Ad man #1: About joining the conversation! And Pepsi.

Ad man #2: This is literally almost perfect. I just can’t help but feel like we should somehow loop in the whole police brutality thing.

Woman: The “whole police brutality thing?”

Ad man #3: You’re so right. That’s such a thing, huh? When it comes to protests and stuff?

Man of color #1: I don’t know. Don’t want to overstep here, but maybe we steer clear of this. Unless we want to genuinely give a platform to one of the organizations tackling this…

Ad man #2: Kendall hands a cop a Pepsi. He cracks it, takes a sip….and smiles. The entire march celebrates.

Ad man #3: And that’s when the Muslim photographer gets her shot!!!!

One man starts to clap, then a few more. Slowly it builds until all the men in the room are clapping and crying vigorously. In a rare show of emotion, they begin hugging each other in congratulations.

Ad man #1: I think our work here is done.


Six months later…

Photos by Victor Virgile and Lambert via Getty Images; Collage by Edith Young.

The post Kendall Jenner’s Pepsi Commercial: the Untold Story appeared first on Man Repeller.

Read the whole story
diogro
21 days ago
reply
São Paulo
Share this story
Delete

The ‘Pocket POTUS’: Tiny Trump meme taken to next level with video treatment

1 Share


 
Everyone by now has probably seen the photoshopped tiny Trump memes on social media and various websites. Including Trump himself. They’re everywhere. Well, npw some clever little fuckers by name of Evil Ice Cream Pictures decided to take it to...

Read the whole story
diogro
66 days ago
reply
São Paulo
Share this story
Delete

Foi tudo um sonho

1 Share

É uma verdade universalmente conhecida na internet que propagadores de spoiler merecem uma morte lenta e saborosa, quem sabe cozidos em banho-maria no sangue da última pessoa que ousou mudar de ideia.

Difícil pensar em uma coisa que traga mais consenso, mais senso de comunidade e uma revolta mais morninha e confortável do que a crença de que revelar partes importantes de uma trama — quer seja televisiva, literária ou cinematográfica — consiste em uma espécie de crime contra o prazer de quem ainda não terminou aquela história.

Quem dera fosse apenas o de quem ainda não terminou uma história que está se desenrolando aqui e agora. É preciso preservar também o prazer de quem sequer começou, de quem não sabe se um dia vai começar, de quem não tem planos concretos, de quem declaradamente não vai. Aos poucos, ganha terreno a ideia de que cada vez mais aspectos de uma trama são importantes e, portanto, spoilers. Resenhas e até críticas são reduzidas a sinopses alongadas que nada podem concluir ou revelar. Vai se formando a noção de que o direito à surpresa deve ser mantido não apenas no campo da ficção, mas também do jornalismo, da vida em geral.

Durante a Olimpíada de 2016, por exemplo, quando os jogos eram transmitidos por gravações na tevê americana, veículos como a NPR adotaram “alertas de spoiler” para notícias. Ao abrir o site da NPR ou sua página no Facebook, você veria chamadas que excluíam a informação factual (quem ganhou, como foi o jogo) em respeito àqueles que ainda não tinham visto a partida. Os anúncios de spoiler foram comemorados por um público que sentia que esse sim era um veículo que o respeitava. Foi um caso de uma ação caça-cliques entendida como um favor ao leitor.

Assistir a qualquer coisa ao vivo tem um valor em si, uma camada de emoção que não pode ser reproduzida numa gravação, ainda que recente. Você e os atletas, o bairro e todo mundo estão, senão no mesmo espaço, ao menos no mesmo minuto, na mesma página. É uma comunhão possível. Mas qual o sentido de não saber o resultado para preservar o prazer de uma gravação? Me parece um caso em que o fetiche do spoiler se sobrepôs a um fetiche às vezes chamado de jornalismo.

O caso da transmissão da Olimpíada nos EUA foi um fenômeno interessante porque um único canal detinha o direito de exibição dos jogos no país. Esse canal decidiu exibir gravações para acomodar melhor as coisas em sua programação (spoiler: para ganhar mais dinheiro). O efeito que se criou foi o de uma bolha. Ali dentro, naquele pequeno país que são os Estados Unidos, os jogos aconteciam em um horário diferente. Eles efetivamente aconteciam em outro horário. Eles só podiam acontecer em outro horário porque os Estados Unidos são uma grande ilha. Fosse no Brasil, isso talvez não se repetiria. Não se repetiria porque nosso interesse por notícias, pessoas e produtos estrangeiros é outro. Porque somos mais permeáveis. Nos Estados Unidos, no entanto, a NBC conseguiu fazer os jogos acontecerem no horário que bem entendia. Ela conseguiu ajustar o tempo cá — pressionando para que as competições de maior sucesso nos Estados Unidos fossem alocadas em horários que não faziam sentido no país que sediava os jogos, para o público concreto desses jogos — e lá, transmitindo gravações protegidas por alertas de spoilers na imprensa nacional. Puf, eles mudaram o tempo dos jogos.

Com um orçamento mais modesto, mas com grande convicção, os pequenos censores do spoiler também tentam mudar o tempo dos seriados, dos filmes, dos livros, criando o sonho de um presente eterno em que eu possa começar hoje a assistir uma série amplamente vista e comentada em 2007 — digamos, Mad Men — sem saber o que aconteceu. No dia em que esse sonho se concretizar, eu estarei, dizem eles, sendo completamente respeitada no meu direito de consumidora tardia de produtos culturais descartáveis.

Para que isso seja possível, as discussões públicas sobre uma obra precisam ser abafadas. A única graça que esses produtos comerciais que consumimos pode ter, a única coisa que esses produtos que no melhor dos casos são diluições infinitesimais de algo que um dia foi bom podem trazer, que é a discussão coletiva, recebe a amarra do spoiler como um pacto de não agressão entre consumidores passados e futuros. Qualquer discussão, análise, ponderação passa a ser calada em um “por favor, vejam”. De um possível analista, o público passa a ser um mero divulgador do que consome.

A lógica do spoiler estabelece que a fruição de uma obra estaria na surpresa individual com o rumo dos acontecimentos. História boa seria aquela que me surpreendesse, que trouxesse um encaminhamento inesperado para os conflitos apresentados. Mas história boa, por outro lado, seria aquela verossímil, então você precisa me surpreender, porém sendo extremamente verossímil. No limite, são expectativas contraditórias. Puxando demais a sardinha para a surpresa você vai parar na ilha de Lost, onde tudo pode acontecer, inclusive qualquer coisa.

Isso porque se você me inseriu em um universo ficcional coerente, me apresentou os conflitos, me ambientou ali, é possível que eu consiga prever resoluções verossímeis. Porque resoluções verossímeis seriam progressões lógicas. Um dos princípios do drama burguês é justamente isso, a concatenação de acontecimentos: uma cena puxa a outra, como se houvesse ali um imperativo lógico, e não uma mão invisível fazendo dos personagens o que bem entendesse.

Na minha adolescência, filme bom, bom mesmo, era o que conseguia atar esses dois nós. Surpreender sem nocautear a verossimilhança interna. Pense em Efeito Borboleta, ou em O Sexto Sentido. Eram roteiros espertos. Eram obras que você pode matar, enterrar e jogar a última pá de cal no segundo em que desvendar o mistério. Porque não tem mais nada ali. Os filmes são um grande nada com um e aí sacou? no fim. A pessoa que disser que eu estraguei O Sexto Sentido ao contar o fim estará completamente correta. A pergunta é se um filme que pode ser estragado com uma frase merece ser preservado.

Mas no caso de obras (mesmo as rebaixadas, comerciais, dramáticas e vazias) que tiverem um fiapo a mais do que O Sexto Sentido, qual seria o trauma? Burlar a ditadura do spoiler é dizer que a fruição de uma obra pode estar em outra coisa que não seja o enredo básico, o argumento.

Existem muitas formas de fruir uma obra que não incluem a surpresa do fim. Quando o público ia assistir a uma tragédia grega, por exemplo, ele muitas vezes já conhecia a história de cabo a rabo, ou no mínimo sabia o básico, os fatos principais. Na peça Agamenon, de Ésquilo, por exemplo, Clitemnestra mata o marido, enquanto em outras versões é o amante dela quem mata, ela é apenas a cúmplice, ou a mandante. Seria, no entanto, inconcebível sentar para assistir a uma versão de Agamenon em que o próprio Agamenon não morresse, mas saísse de lá sobre duas pernas berrando “por essa vocês não esperavam” ou “foi tudo um sonho”.

Isso porque a graça de uma peça não estava na tensão dramática, em não saber o que vai acontecer em seguida, e sim nas emoções suscitadas e no debate em torno da história. É por isso que o “clímax” da tragédia, por assim dizer, que a liberação da tensão dramática, acontecia muito antes do que o clímax de um drama burguês. Para o espectador do drama burguês, o clímax resolve todos os mistérios da trama, fecha a conta e passa a régua.

Já na tragédia grega, o ápice de tensão era o momento em que os personagens se tornavam conscientes da natureza dos acontecimentos, que se reconheciam, que entendiam seu lugar no mundo. Édipo compreendia que o assassino que ele buscava era ele próprio. Nesse momento, o véu da ironia dramática era subitamente retirado. Ou seja, o público deixava de saber mais do que os personagens (tem essa: nas peças gregas a ignorância muitas vezes estava no personagem. Era ele quem ia se surpreender, não o público).

Depois disso tinha: todo o resto. O embate de emoções que isso causava, o debate. Conte para o coleguinha que Édipo mata o pai e casa com a mãe e você terá retirado um total de nenhum prazer dele em assistir a Édipo Tirano. Mas se contar para o próprio Édipo quem são seu pai e sua mãe, capaz de não ter história.

Concedo que dos festivais gregos para cá alguma água já rolou, mas do drama burguês para cá inúmeras águas rolaram, inclusive a do meu pranto. É verdade que grande parte das obras que vemos e lemos hoje ainda é dramática e, portanto, depende ou pelo menos se beneficia amplamente de um “pela mãe do guarda”. Não estou dizendo aqui que quem reclama de spoiler não sabe consumir essas obras. Pelo contrário: é justamente por entenderem a fragilidade do prazer trazido por essas obras que as pessoas se armam contra o spoiler.

Mas vamos comer esse M&M’s de garfo e faca. Vamos colocar o guardanapo no colo. É isso que fazemos ao nos recusarmos a fugir de spoilers em favor de uma discussão pública sobre uma obra. Sobre obras que, bem ou mal, são o nosso repertório coletivo atual. Vamos observar as notas de carvalho dessa Coca-cola, vamos deixar o Dolly respirar e vamos esperar que, meus sais, algo melhor seja servido.

Read the whole story
diogro
78 days ago
reply
São Paulo
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories