613 stories
·
8 followers

A dedicated amateur astronomer in Brazil caught an object hitting Jupiter's surface

1 Comment and 2 Shares
An image of Jupiter taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope

Brazilian amateur astronomer José Luis Pereira was shooting Jupiter on September 13 when an object struck the gas giant.

Pereira used a QHY5III462C camera with a Newtonian 275mm F5.3 telescope in São Caetano do Sul, São Paulo, Brazil when he captured the incredible event. It was a clear night, so he recorded 25 videos to put through a program called DeTeCt. The software is used to analyze video and detect impacts on Jupiter and Saturn.

The camera Pereira used records color at enhanced near-infrared wavelengths. It uses a 2MP Sony IMX462 CMOS image sensor. The camera records 1920 x 1080 video. Pereira used an IRUV cut filter when observing Jupiter and used a Televue Powermate 5x (F26.5) eyepiece. The QHY5III462C starts at $299 USD.

While impacts on Jupiter are not exceedingly rare, they're far from common. Per Nature, Jupiter is hit 'by as many as 65 meteorite impacts each year.' For Pereira to have been in a clear nighttime location and witnessed one with his telescope is very fortunate. That said, he's a dedicated observer, which certainly increases his odds of observing something incredible.

SpaceWeather.com—an excellent resource for monitoring aurora conditions, by the way—wrote about the collision on September 14. German astronomer Harald Paleske witnessed the impact, too. SpaceWeather writes 'The most likely explanation is a small asteroid or comet striking the giant planet; an asteroid in the 100m size range would do the trick.'

Pereira told Space.com, 'I am an assiduous planetary observer. When the planets Jupiter, Saturn and Mars are in opposition, I try to make images in every possible night of clear skies. Especially [of] the planet Jupiter, my favorite.' Of his video, Pereira said, 'To my surprise, in the first video I noticed a different glow on the planet, but I didn't pay much attention to it as I thought it might be something related to the parameters adopted, and I continued watching normally. So as not to stop the captures in progress for fear that weather conditions would worsen, I didn't check the first video.'

He fed the videos into DeTeCt and went to bed. It wasn't until September 14 when he checked the software and saw that it had detected a likely collision. Pereira then sent his information to Marc Delcroix of the French Astronomical Society, and Delcroix confirmed that Pereira had recorded a collision that occurred on September 13 at 6:39 p.m. EDT. 'For me it was a moment of great emotion, as I have been looking for a record of [such an] event for many years,' Pereira wrote to Space.com.

To see more from Pereira, visit his YouTube channel, Flickr page and Facebook. There's also an incredibly detailed article showing the impact as detected by other astronomers on AstroSurf.

Read the whole story
diogro
69 days ago
reply
São Paulo
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
JayM
70 days ago
reply
Hmmmm. Why does this feel fake to me?
Atlanta, GA
fxer
67 days ago
linked article says 5 people have verified so far, I assume you’re old enough to remember this one https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comet_Shoemaker%E2%80%93Levy_9

Science Is Like A Chicken Coop

1 Share
From: Richard McElreath
Duration: 54:00

Plenary delivered to sortee.org conference July 2021.

Abstract: The quality and transparency of scholarship is influenced by
professional incentives. So say we all. Naturally much discussion
focuses on reforming incentives. But reforming scholarly incentives is
not easy, and incentives may matter less than structural and
demographic forces. Using analogies from population biology, I sketch
some problems and opportunities for effective science reform. First,
incentives arise from structure as much as from explicit reward.
Second, incentives are not all—demography and development
matter as well. Third, there are fundamental limits on the power of
incentives when the fates of individuals are largely up to chance.
There are reasons to think reform can succeed, especially if we adopt
a dynamic and structured view of the cultural evolution of scholarly
communities.

Read the whole story
diogro
121 days ago
reply
São Paulo
Share this story
Delete

Drowning out the far-right with terrible jazz

1 Share

More of this, please.

A Danish collective of jazz musicians have perfected their far-right counter-protest strategy. "Free Jazz Against Paludan" follows the far-right politician Rasmus Paludan around the country and plays jazz very loudly and very badly at his events, in a bid to drown out his voice.

Paludan, founder of the political party Stram Kurs (Hard Line), is notorious for organising "demonstrations" in neighbourhoods with large immigrant populations, where he burns, throws, and stomps on Qurans behind walls of police officers. A self-proclaimed "guardian of freedom" and "light of the Danes", Paludan considers immigrants and Islam enemies of the Danish people, as well as the country's values, traditions and general way of life.

Since May, jazz musicians countrywide have crashed his demonstrations armed with trumpets, bongo drums and saxophones. When allowed in close proximity, they play right in his face, to his visible annoyance. If they can't reach Paludan – who received a suspended sentence in 2019 for a string of offences, including racism – they simply play loudly enough to drown out his voice or draw attention away from him.

Read the full article here.

Image: Free Jazz Against Paludan

Read the whole story
diogro
441 days ago
reply
São Paulo
Share this story
Delete

"Anarchist Anthropologist" David Graeber, credited with coining "The 99%," has died

2 Shares

David Graeber hated being called "The Anarchist Anthropologist." But he was both those things — an anarchist activist, a figurehead of the Occupy movement, and a professor of anthropology at the London School of Economics. His wife reports that he has passed away at the age of 59. No cause of death is mentioned.

Graeber is perhaps best known his writings about "Bullshit Jobs" — which started as an essay in Strike Magazine and later expanded into a full book, as well as other spin-off pieces. Graeber's argument about bullshit jobs is a critique of the institutionalized administrative bureaucracies that humans have created to simply feel busy and fulfilled and important, even though it completely backfires. We spent 40 years facilitating communications between onion layers of sub-sub-sub-sub contractors, and sure, the money moves around, but there's no productivity — and no one's happy, even though they're told to aspire to those make-yourself-look-busy jobs.

My first introduction to this concept was his Harper's essay "Punching the Clock," which has stuck with me ever since:

Our society values work. We expect a job to serve a purpose and to have a larger meaning. For workers who have internalized this value system, there is little that is more demoralizing than waking up five days a week to perform a task that one believes is a waste of time.

[…]

The make-believe aspect of the work is precisely what performers of bullshit jobs find the most infuriating. Just about anyone in a supervised wage-labor job finds it maddening to pretend to be busy. Working is meant to serve a purpose—if make-believe play is an expression of human freedom, then make-believe work imposed by others represents a total lack of freedom. It's unsurprising, then, that the first historical occurrence of the notion that some people ought to be working at all times, or that work should be made up to fill their time even in the absence of things that need doing, concerns workers who are not free: prisoners and slaves.The make-believe aspect of the work is precisely what performers of bullshit jobs find the most infuriating. Just about anyone in a supervised wage-labor job finds it maddening to pretend to be busy. Working is meant to serve a purpose—if make-believe play is an expression of human freedom, then make-believe work imposed by others represents a total lack of freedom. It's unsurprising, then, that the first historical occurrence of the notion that some people ought to be working at all times, or that work should be made up to fill their time even in the absence of things that need doing, concerns workers who are not free: prisoners and slaves.

Graeber was a champion of the working class, who was unafraid to speak truth to power, and point out the glaring chasms of hypocrisy between the platitudes that civilization speaks about itself, and the things that actually make humans productive, peaceful, and happy. You can see this clearly in the video above, where he points out that government debt is actually a good thing, because it stimulates the private sector, and means that people are making stuff, together — and that all the lip service paid to balancing federal budgets and reducing federal deficits is in fact meaningless confusions between society and one's personal bank account. He expounded upon this topic in his book titled Debt.

Here's another short piece that's been resonating with me lately:

What we think of as archetypally women's work – looking after people, seeing to their wants and needs, explaining, reassuring, anticipating what the boss wants or is thinking, not to mention caring for, monitoring, and maintaining plants, animals, machines, and other objects – accounts for a far greater proportion of what working-class people do when they're working than hammering, carving, hoisting, or harvesting things.

This is true not only because most working-class people are women (since most people in general are women), but because we have a skewed view even of what men do. As striking tube workers recently had to explain to indignant commuters, 'ticket takers' don't in fact spend most of their time taking tickets: they spend most of their time explaining things, fixing things, finding lost children, and taking care of the old, sick and confused.

If you think about it, is this not what life is basically about? Human beings are projects of mutual creation. Most of the work we do is on each other. The working classes just do a disproportionate share. They are the caring classes, and always have been. It is just the incessant demonisation directed at the poor by those who benefit from their caring labour that makes it difficult, in a public forum such as this, to acknowledge it.

As you can probably tell, I am truly and genuinely bummed about Graeber's passing, in a way I'm usually not when it comes to people I've never met. If you're not familiar with his work, I encourage you to check it out.

Rest in power, David Graeber, and thanks for sharing your mind with us for a while.

Screenshot: YouTube / The Guardian

Read the whole story
diogro
444 days ago
reply
São Paulo
Share this story
Delete

A "buttload" is apparently a formal unit of imperial measurement

1 Comment

I saw this on Twitter the other day and it blew my mind:

After immediately falling down a Google hole about it, I discovered that this is, indeed, true! A butt, also known as a pipe, is a unit of measure for English Brewery Cask Units and English Wine Cask Units. It's the second-largest barrel size, equal to half a tun, which was typically 252 Imperial Gallons (although that exact quantity has changed throughout history; current standards place an English Tun at 259 US gallons or 216 Imperial Gallons).

According to Difford's Guide, the British brewing industry continues to use a Butt metric equal to 108 imperial gallons; this is, apparently, different than a Sherry Butt, which is more long and slender than other barrels, and holds between 105 and 110 imperial gallons.

A 2014 Gizmodo article was similarly mind-blown at this discovery, and did a little research into the etymology (buttymology?):

The words are not only derived from Old English but also Dutch, Italian, and French. Butt actually comes from "botte," a Medieval French and Italian word for boot. In Italy, at least, botte is still used to refer to a wine cask.

This makes me even more confused about Pork Butt, which is in fact a shoulder, but named for a boot that's also a barre (and can also mean "punches?"). Etymology Online offered some further clarity, connecting this all back to the Latin "buttis," a word used to refer to a cask, and which later became adapted into "bottle."

Anyway I just spent a buttload of time researching butt barrels.

Casks — barrel, butt, punchon, pipe, barrique, hogshead [Simon Difford / Difford's Guide]

A Buttload is an Actual Unit of Measurement [Commonplace Fun Facts]

Casks (barrels, hogsheads, butts) [Whiskey Invest Direct]

'Butt' is an actual unit of measurement [Adam Clark Estes / Gizmodo]

Image: Public Domain via NeedPix

Read the whole story
diogro
458 days ago
reply
491 liters, if anyone's curious
São Paulo
organelas
455 days ago
That's a buttload of liters
Share this story
Delete

THIS is how you do a mid-song guitar switch

1 Share

The late great Stevie Ray knew how to get it done. Watch the master swap guitars onstage like it ain't no big deal.

screengrab SRV Bootlegs/YouTube

(The Awesomer)

Read the whole story
diogro
468 days ago
reply
São Paulo
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories